Foshan Wing Chun Yui Kil signature presented to Wai Po Tang, written by Foshan Wing Chun Kung fu Grandmaster Yui Kil - embodies qualification of self defence, traditional wing chun, kung fu, wu shu, the same related family as yip man, bruce lee, ip chun but not the same as Jackie Chan or Jet LiMartial Art Institute Wing Chun Kung Fu, yin yang emblem represents adaptation of taoist philosophy of universal balance.  It's philosophy of Kung Fu is found in Wai Po Tang  Foshan Wing Chun Kung fu system. Grandmaster Yui Kil - embodies qualification of self defence, traditional wing chun, kung fu, wu shu, the same related family as yip man, bruce lee, ip chun.  Jackie Chan or Jet Li are making the same universal presence worldwide as did bruce lee many years ago.  It appears the circle of oriental culture is in vogue again.Wai Po Tang signature written by Foshan Wing Chun Kung fu Grandmaster Yui Kil - embodies qualification of self defence, traditional wing chun, kung fu, wu shu, the same related family as yip man, bruce lee, ip chun but not the same as Jackie Chan or Jet Li

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Foshan's Wing Chun Great Grandmaster Yui Choi, Wing chun 5th generation of shaolin wing chun self defence martial art expertChina Wing chun kung fu of shaolin ng mui wing chun self defence martial art wu shu heritage.  Other Developmental contributors in china with their own oragnisation  are yui choi, yui kil, leung jan, yip man, ip chun, ip ching, pan nam, go moon, and many moreFoshan's Wing Chun Grandmaster Yui Kil, Wing chun 6th generation of shaolin wing chun self defence martial art expertClick here for UK Wing Chun Clubs, Schools, Centres, in London, Wimbledon, Croydon, Sutton, Crawley.Click here for Biography of Wai-Po Tang, International Wing Chun Master Wai-Po Tang, Wing chun 5th generation of shaolin wing chun self defence martial art expert

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Hong Kong China Wing chun kung fu of shaolin ng mui wing chun self defence martial art wu shu heritage. A fundamental place of wing chun development by yip man, bruce lee, ip chun, ip ching, william cheung, wong sheun long, leung sheun, leung ting,  lok yui, and many moreSweden Wing Chun Clubs, eaching Wing chun 5th generation shaolin wing chun kung fu self defence martial art expert from wai po tang and associatesEurope wing chun teaching Wing chun 5th generation shaolin wing chun kung fu self defence martial art expert from wai po tangRussia Wing Chun clubs, teaching Wing chun 5th generation shaolin wing chun kung fu self defence martial art expert from wai po tang and associates

Master Wai-Po Tang, Wing Chun Kung Fu Club,P.O. Box 628, Richmond,Surrey,TW9 1FF,England,UK.
Tel: 07976 610901 (UK) ; +44 7976 610901 (International)

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CROSSED-HANDS IN HONG KONG

 


Wai-Po Tang outside the Tang Village Ancestral Temple, NT. Hong Kong in 1988

The flight from Thailand to Hong Kong was a short one, but always a place for self-evaluation. Master Tang was sad to leave Thailand but excited to meet some famous Hong Kong Wing Chun masters. Master Wai-Po Tang arrived Hong Kong Kai Tak airport in February 1988, still hopping around on one leg as a result of the ruptured ligament of the knee.

The explorations of Hong Kong's Kung Fu clubs/schools were meant to be general research or sightseeing. Before going on to some of the fights in Hong Kong, I want to tell a similar story that occurred in the previous year in 1987.

Tang visited a very famous Hong Kong Wing Chun Grandmaster whom invited Tang to his home to show him video footages and documents and demonstration of Yip Man Wing Chun (this meeting took place just a few weeks before meeting Great Grandmaster Yui Kil in China). There were discussions on traditional art and applied Wing Chun which led to very interesting debates. The Grandmaster asked Tang to come back to his home next day to continue the research.


Wai-Po Tang practising Front kick

On arrival the following day, Tang noticed there were additional two of this Grandmaster's top students. Tang had a feeling that they wanted to prove something. Tang politely greeted everyone, the Grandmaster then asked Tang to perform the forms and the wooden dummy form. This request was typical of evaluating someone before challenging him or her. The problem was that the forms were hardly a good measure of someone's combat abilities.

One of the Grandmaster top students (MT) sarcastically remarked aloud, saying Tang's movement are very powerful but he gestured that he was not impressed. He challenged Tang to Chi Sau (sticky hands), and Tang was surprised but obliged. This top student MT commented about all the technical know-how, but as soon Tang close the distance using very basic techniques, MT fell onto the floor and continued that way for a short while. Tang did not want to strike MT in case he might hurt MT, and cause embarrassment to Grandmaster. Tang trapped MT to one corner, at this point MT lost his temper and attempted to strike Tang with his elbow. This was considered all-out fight. Tang avoided the elbow strike and countered with a double palm strike that knocked MT flying back into a glass cabinet. Tang wanted to finish him off but the Grandmaster requested a stop to it. As a mark of respect Tang did stop. The Grandmaster was so impressed that he accompanied Tang to meet the Great Grandmaster Yui Kil in Foshan, China.

The above story was a very similar event to the challenge fight that took place in February 1988 in Hong Kong after arriving from Thailand. Tang was walking along a side road of Nathan Street, Kowloon, and noticed a Wing Chun school. Tang was pleased, and asked the master of the school if it was possible to look at the training session. Two brothers ran the school; one of the brothers was running the school at the time. Tang was told that their students frequently compete in full contact competitions in Taiwan.

After watching for a while, the master asked Tang if he practiced Wing Chun and Tang told him that he did. The friendly chat suddenly became hostile. Tang commented that some of his students are very good, but the master took it the wrong way and suggested that Tang was not in a position to comment.

Tang knew then all that friendly chat was a pre-requisite of gaining information before the attack. The problem was, there were so many of them, and Tang did not know what kind of action they were willing to execute.

The master condescended, 'Why don't you try out some Sticky Hands with my students?' Tang continuously declined, emphasising that he only wanted to watch. Next minute, the whole class surrounded Tang, and a top student stood in the middle of the circle staring at Tang. Tang obliged, and crossed-hands with this top student. The student was no match but Tang did not want to expose him to too much embarrassment, hence held back the attacks. Tang easily controlled this student even with an injured knee from the previous fight in Thailand.

The master then remarked arrogantly saying Tang had many weaknesses and openings in the sticky hands, and that Tang's sticky hands were very different to the Hong Kong style - suggesting Tang was ignorant. The master then challenged Tang. Tang placed his arms on the master's, and suddenly the master launches determined powerful punches to Tang's head. Tang was simply at his peak of reaction and response time. All the attacks were so easily neutralised. The master got frustrated and angry, and decided to sneak a low kick in but Tang intercepted the low kick, and Tang trapped it between his foot and shin.

Tang felt it was time to teach this arrogant master a small lesson, Tang launched attacks at will, and every strike falling just short of contact. Just a couple of strikes connected to let the master know that all other strikes could have connected and could have been very hard. The master was so overwhelmed by Tang's restraint and skills, and admitted that sometimes it is wrong to make too quicker judgement. The master went the kitchen and brought Tang a cup of Chinese tea; this was a symbol of high respect.

Tang was glad it was a cup of tea and not the choppers. Tang accepted the tea, and left the master with a positive change of attitude. This was one of several incidents that occurred in Hong Kong and unfortunately the stories are all too similar. Tang's general conception of a lot Hong Kong masters he had came across, were very insecure and always needed to prove they are better than you. This behaviour was not generally found in China, instead in China they normally praise good development and does not find political angles to ridicule. I guess in a small land, people tend to be more naturally competitive. Hong Kong is certainly a place of commerce and politics, and this is very apparent in the martial art fraternity. People just don't have the time for training Kung Fu.

Tang's next trip was a very short train journey across the border of Hong Kong by train, into the Canton Province to meet his Grandmaster Yui Kil. This story will be in the forthcoming Today's Topic.


Great Grandmaster Yui Kil in Foshan Temple in 1988


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Master Wai-Po Tang, Martial Art Institute International, Wing Chun Kung Fu Club Classes, P.O. Box 628, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 1FF, England, UK.
Tel: 07976 610901 (mobile- UK) ; +44 7976 610901 (mobile-international)
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