Foshan Wing Chun Yui Kil signature presented to Wai Po Tang, written by Foshan Wing Chun Kung fu Grandmaster Yui Kil - embodies qualification of self defence, traditional wing chun, kung fu, wu shu, the same related family as yip man, bruce lee, ip chun but not the same as Jackie Chan or Jet LiMartial Art Institute Wing Chun Kung Fu, yin yang emblem represents adaptation of taoist philosophy of universal balance.  It's philosophy of Kung Fu is found in Wai Po Tang  Foshan Wing Chun Kung fu system. Grandmaster Yui Kil - embodies qualification of self defence, traditional wing chun, kung fu, wu shu, the same related family as yip man, bruce lee, ip chun.  Jackie Chan or Jet Li are making the same universal presence worldwide as did bruce lee many years ago.  It appears the circle of oriental culture is in vogue again.Wai Po Tang signature written by Foshan Wing Chun Kung fu Grandmaster Yui Kil - embodies qualification of self defence, traditional wing chun, kung fu, wu shu, the same related family as yip man, bruce lee, ip chun but not the same as Jackie Chan or Jet Li

Martial Art Institute

Foshan's Wing Chun Great Grandmaster Yui Choi, Wing chun 5th generation of shaolin wing chun self defence martial art expertChina Wing chun kung fu of shaolin ng mui wing chun self defence martial art wu shu heritage.  Other Developmental contributors in china with their own oragnisation  are yui choi, yui kil, leung jan, yip man, ip chun, ip ching, pan nam, go moon, and many moreFoshan's Wing Chun Grandmaster Yui Kil, Wing chun 6th generation of shaolin wing chun self defence martial art expertClick here for UK Wing Chun Clubs, Schools, Centres, in London, Wimbledon, Croydon, Sutton, Crawley.Click here for Biography of Wai-Po Tang, International Wing Chun Master Wai-Po Tang, Wing chun 5th generation of shaolin wing chun self defence martial art expert

Today's Topics

Hong Kong China Wing chun kung fu of shaolin ng mui wing chun self defence martial art wu shu heritage. A fundamental place of wing chun development by yip man, bruce lee, ip chun, ip ching, william cheung, wong sheun long, leung sheun, leung ting,  lok yui, and many moreSweden Wing Chun Clubs, eaching Wing chun 5th generation shaolin wing chun kung fu self defence martial art expert from wai po tang and associatesEurope wing chun teaching Wing chun 5th generation shaolin wing chun kung fu self defence martial art expert from wai po tangRussia Wing Chun clubs, teaching Wing chun 5th generation shaolin wing chun kung fu self defence martial art expert from wai po tang and associates

Master Wai-Po Tang, Wing Chun Kung Fu Club,P.O. Box 628, Richmond,Surrey,TW9 1FF,England,UK.
Tel: 07976 610901 (UK) ; +44 7976 610901 (International)

Magazines & Newspapers' Articles

 

Email

CHALLENGES BEYOND OUTERLIMIT:
APPLIED WING CHUN IN THAILAND

 

wai-po tang in Thailand 1988

Self-discovery is made when a person challenges the boundaries of normal perceptions of the internal and external world. Martial artists often tread a very lonely path to discover or challenge the notions or principles of learned combat. Everyone has a story to tell, the truth is often in the eyes of the beholder, particularly with fights or training methodologies.

Today's topic tells the story of Master Tang's 1988 Far East Tour - an emotive narrative that looks at the journey to Thailand and Hong Kong and China. This chapter will discuss Master Tang's experience in Thailand and in the following weeks we will discuss Hong Kong and China.

In January 1988, Master Tang decided to go alone to the Far East, stopping at Thailand first. He packed his bags, and went on his own to seek the path of discovery. He said that it was much more adventurous to go alone, and to expect the unexpected. It was a great coincident that Master Tang was accepted into Thailand's top professional Thai boxing camp 'Lupraba'.

wai po tang kicking while trainer looks on
Wai-Po Tang working out prior to the fight

Lupraba camp houses 30 professional fighters, it is located approximately 2 hours drive from Bangkok, set in a remote dusty town among the hills. The camp was considered of a high standard even though, 3-4 boxers shared a small room, and the floor was the standard bed. Master Tang was determined to tough it out like any of the other boxers and did not want any special treatment from the owner.

wai po tang at Lupraba Camp
Wai-Po Tang at the Lupraba Camp 1988

Master Tang shared a room with a former champion 'Odnoi Lupraba' and another guy. Both became very good friends despite the obvious language barrier.

Odnoi Thaiboxing champion of Bangkok Limpuni Stadium Odnoi (left) and wai po tang (right) at Lupraba
Odnoi Luprabra and Wang Yu Lupraba (Wai-Po Tang)

Master Tang was shocked by the magnitude of Thai boxing and its high standard. There were so many really good and tough fighters, and these fighters fight for a living every month for years on end. The Thais were so warm and friendly outside the ring, absolutely no 'bullshit' attitude, but inside the ring, they were formidable. Master Tang notice this general behaviour with most high standard fighters of any martial art discipline, he had previously noticed many 'non-fighter' martial artists tend to have the biggest attitude problem. Master Tang was open-minded to research and learn from anyone with great knowledge and substance. Hence, the relationships with his stable mates and trainers were very positive and constructive.

Prior to Thailand, Master Tang had never done any kickboxing or Thai boxing. He has however, formulated and researched applied Wing Chun (includes investigation of mixed martial arts disciplines). Hence, he wanted to evaluate whether such self-researches can be applied in the real world of high combatants.

During the 3 weeks stay in Thailand, Master Tang went through a series of test fights, he then represented the boxing camp 'Lupraba' in a professional fight at a Thai festival. The fight was schedule for 5 rounds. Master Tang was promoted as the Hong Kong Kung Fu fighter 'Wang-Yu Lupraba'. Despite Master Tang's request that he did not want the fight to be promoted as Kung Fu Vs Thai Boxing, but the promoters announced it just that. It created a lot of interest among the crowd - plenty of betting went on. Master Tang recalled the atmosphere was absolutely electric.

The opponent was a Thai boxer; the crowd was cheering for him and booed Master Tang. Master Tang had only his corner men and a few stable mates supporting him - it was an extremely daunting experience. The humidity was unbearable, sweat was pouring before the warm up began. The crowd shouting to each other - betting against Master Tang.

Corner men preparing Wai-Po Tang for the fight
Cornermen preparing Wai-Po Tang for the fight

Round 1 - The Thai boxer came straight in with a powerful low kick to Tang's lead leg. Tang moved away from the following kick. Thai boxer continue the attack, Tang wanted to test the opponent's reach, impact force, and repertoire by evading all the strikes. To the crowd, Tang looked as though he was getting chased by a more aggressive and competent fighter. The round ended with Thai boxer ahead on points.

Round 2 - The Thai boxer deliver a powerful round kick, this was leg-blocked by Tang simultaneously countered with a right cross on the Thai boxer's chin. The Thai boxer was almost knocked-out, but Tang could not follow-up because the kick had dislocated his knee joint. The ease of dislocation was due to pre-fight injury (partial rupture anterior cruciate ligament). The crowd was wondering why Tang did not follow through while the opponent was half dazed, but Tang did not show any sign of pain save onslaught from the opponent.


wai po tang in red shorts against Thaiboxer in the professional fight
Wai-Po Tang in red shorts

The Thai boxer recovered and threw some kicks and punches that were blocked by Tang from a stationary position. All the time, Tang was twisting his leg trying to get the joint back in place. The Thai boxer began to dance in and out of Tang's range making teasing gestures. Suddenly, the joint went back in place, Tang darted forward and delivered a powerful leg kick to the opponent's thigh. The Thai boxer fell straight down, Tang followed through with a knee to the head and hooks to the head that rendered a knockout in the 2nd round.

The crowd went wild; they switched side and cheered for Tang. Tang was overjoyed and he paraded around the ring in glory. Apparently, Tang's single kick to the opponent's thigh had put his opponent on crutches for 2 weeks. Hence, the Thai boxer was carried out on a stretcher. The Thai boxing camp that Tang represented was also overjoyed, and Tang gave his fight prize money to the camp. He insisted that he did not want to fight for money, and was only interested with the journey experience and privileged to represent a famous camp.

The next day, local people were waving and congratulating Tang calling out his boxing name 'Wang Yu…Wang Yu'. Master Tang remembers to this day that the Thai experience was a great experience, and hold high respect for the Thai's fight standard, and their general warmth and friendliness as human beings. Tang is grateful to the owner of the Lupraba camp and his stable mates. From this eye-opening adventure in Thailand, Master Tang takes a flight to Hong Kong to meet some Wing Chun masters. This story will be told in the next forthcoming 'Today's Topic'.


Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Master Wai-Po Tang, Martial Art Institute International, Wing Chun Kung Fu Club Classes, P.O. Box 628, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 1FF, England, UK.
Tel: 07976 610901 (mobile- UK) ; +44 7976 610901 (mobile-international)
© 1986-2002 Martial Art Institute and its associations. All rights reserved.
Search Engines: msn yahoo excite hotmail hotbot Google All the Web excite findwhat infoseek galaxy about askjeeves searchenginecolossus lifetsyle linkcentre lycos mirago netlondon ukplus bbc yahoo uk Search Engines